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In their books "Freakonomics," "SuperFreakonomics" and "Think Like a Freak", Steven D. Levitt and Stephen J. Dubner explore "the hidden side of everything," telling stories about cheating schoolteachers and eating champions while teaching us all to think a bit more creatively, rationally, and productively. The Freakonomics Radio podcast, hosted by Dubner, carries on that tradition with weekly episodes. Prepare to be enlightened, engaged, perhaps enraged, and definitely surprised.

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People Aren’t Dumb. The World Is Hard. (Jul 12th, 2018)

You wouldn’t think you could win a Nobel Prize for showing that humans tend to make irrational decisions. But that’s what Richard Thaler has done. The founder of behavioral economics describes his unlikely route to success; his reputation for being lazy; and his efforts to fix the world — one nudge at a time.

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The Future of Freakonomics Radio (Jul 3rd, 2018)

After 8 years and more than 300 episodes, it was time to either 1) quit, or 2) make the show bigger and better. We voted for number 2. Here’s a peek behind the curtain and a preview of what you’ll be hearing next.

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In Praise of Incrementalism (Rebroadcast) (Jun 28th, 2018)

What do Renaissance painting, civil-rights movements, and Olympic cycling have in common? In each case, huge breakthroughs came from taking tiny steps. In a world where everyone is looking for the next moonshot, we shouldn’t ignore the power of incrementalism.

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In Praise of Maintenance (Rebroadcast) (Jun 21st, 2018)

Has our culture's obsession with innovation led us to neglect the fact that things also need to be taken care of?

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How to Catch World Cup Fever (Jun 14th, 2018)

For soccer fans, it's easy. For the rest of us? Not so much, especially since the U.S. team didn't qualify. So here's what to watch for even if you have no team to root for. Because the World Cup isn't just a gargantuan sporting event; it's a microcosm of human foibles and (yep) economic theory brought to life.

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How to Build a Smart City (Jun 7th, 2018)

We are in the midst of a historic (and wholly unpredicted) rise in urbanization. But it's hard to retrofit old cities for the 21st century. Enter Dan Doctoroff. The man who helped modernize New York City — and tried to bring the Olympics there — is now C.E.O. of a Google-funded startup that is building, from scratch, the city of the future.

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How Stupid Is Our Obsession With Lawns? (Rebroadcast) (May 31st, 2018)

Nearly two percent of America is grassy green. Sure, lawns are beautiful and useful and they smell great. But are the costs — financial, environmental and otherwise — worth the benefits?

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The Most Vilified Industry in America Is Also the Most Charitable (May 24th, 2018)

Pharmaceutical firms donate an enormous amount of their products (and some cash too). But it doesn't seem to be helping their reputation. We ask Pfizer's generosity chief why the company gives so much, who it really helps, and whether all this philanthropy is just corporate whitewashing.

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Does Doing Good Give You License to Be Bad? (May 17th, 2018)

Corporate Social Responsibility programs can attract better job applicants who'll work for less money. But they also encourage employees to misbehave. Don't laugh — you too probably engage in “moral licensing,” even if you don't know it.

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5 Psychology Terms You’re Probably Misusing (May 10th, 2018)

We all like to throw around terms that describe human behavior — “bystander apathy” and “steep learning curve” and “hard-wired.” Most of the time, they don't actually mean what we think they mean. But don't worry — the experts are getting it wrong, too.

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Evolution, Accelerated (Rebroadcast) (May 3rd, 2018)

A breakthrough in genetic technology has given humans more power than ever to change nature. It could help eliminate hunger and disease; it could also lead to the sort of dystopia we used to only read about in sci-fi novels. So what happens next?

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The Most Ambitious Thing Humans Have Ever Attempted (Apr 26th, 2018)

Sure, medical progress has been astounding. But today the U.S. spends more on healthcare than any other country, with so-so outcomes. Atul Gawande — cancer surgeon, public-health researcher, and best-selling author — has some simple ideas for treating a painfully complex system.

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Why the Trump Tax Cuts Are Terrible/Awesome (Part 2) (Apr 19th, 2018)

Three former White House economists weigh in on the new tax bill. A sample: "The overwhelming evidence is that the trickle-down, magic-beanstalk beans argument — that's just nonsense."

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Why the Trump Tax Cuts are Awesome/Terrible (Part 1) (Apr 12th, 2018)

Kevin Hassett, chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers, explains the thinking behind the controversial new Republican tax package — and why its critics are wrong. (Next week, we'll hear from the critics.)

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Extra: Ray Dalio Full Interview (Apr 9th, 2018)

Stephen Dubner's conversation with the founder and longtime C.E.O. of Bridgewater Associates, recorded for the Freakonomics Radio series “The Secret Life of a C.E.O.”

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The Invisible Paw (Apr 5th, 2018)

Humans, it has long been thought, are the only animal to engage in economic activity. But what if we've had it exactly backward?

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Extra: Mark Zuckerberg Full Interview (Apr 2nd, 2018)

Stephen Dubner's conversation with the Facebook founder and C.E.O., recorded for the Freakonomics Radio series “The Secret Life of a C.E.O.”

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Everything You Always Wanted to Know About Money (But Were Afraid to Ask) (Rebroadcast) (Mar 29th, 2018)

The bad news: roughly 70 percent of Americans are financially illiterate. The good news: all the important stuff can fit on one index card. Here's how to become your own financial superhero.

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Extra: Carol Bartz Full Interview (Mar 26th, 2018)

Stephen Dubner's conversation with the former C.E.O. of Yahoo, recorded for the Freakonomics Radio series “The Secret Life of a C.E.O.”

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The Stupidest Thing You Can Do With Your Money (Rebroadcast) (Mar 22nd, 2018)

It's hard enough to save for a house, tuition, or retirement. So why are we willing to pay big fees for subpar investment returns? Enter the low-cost index fund. The revolution will not be monetized.

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